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Welcome to

chiapas

Location

chiapas

México

Océano
Pacífico

Golfo de México

Guatemala

Our offers from Chiapas

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sakubel

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State: Chiapas

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bankilal

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State: Chiapas

Our presence in Chiapas

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Hectares

Coffee producers

39

87

Average farm size per producer (Ha)

Men

Women

0.44 ha

77

10

Communities

9

Coffee production in Chiapas

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1

Production in Chiapas during the 2019-2020 harvest was 1,558K bags (60kg)

Chiapas contributes to 39.1% of the national production

place

0,6

Average farm size

hectares

Main varietals

chiapas

Marsellesa, Oro Azteca, Typica and Gesha

is the biggest supplier of organic certified coffee in Mexico

90%

More than 90% of the coffee is washed (no official data available)

700-2,000

masl

Sources : Mexico’s Coffee: states and regions /Review Fitotec Mexico/Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development

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Production methods in Chiapas

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5

40

30

20

10

*Height in meters

1.8%

Forest system

62.3%

Traditional polyculture

3.3%

Commercial polyculture

30.4%

Shade-grown monoculture

1.8%

Full-sun monoculture

*100% of the farms we buy coffee from are traditional polyculture systems.
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Indigenous languages in Chiapas 

5,543,828 total speakers

645,687

population

535,448

population

199,061

population

99,240

population

60,083

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population

21,821

population

Zoque

Others

Tseltal

Tsotsil

Ch'ol

Tojolabal

In the communities where we buy coffee the producers are native speakers of indigenous languages, with 91% speaking Tseltal and 9% speaking Tsotsil.

Culture and tradition

1

Artisan textiles reflect a great cultural wealth of Chiapas, such as the huipil (blouse or embellished dress in Nahuatl) - a work of art created by indigenous women where each embroidered detail carries profound symbolism that changes across different regions.

2

As migrations towards colder areas began, the Maya people had to replace their sacred Ceiba tree with the pine tree, which is now commonly found in cemeteries, churches, and altars throughout Altos of Chiapas.

3

Given that water is not only a vital necessity but also a sacred element for the chiapanecas communities, festivities take place in certain areas every 3rd of May, marking the onset of the rainy season and celebrating the sacredness of water. Live music fills the air as people drink a spiritual beverage known as pox, while the water sources are adorned with crosses, candles, and food, serving as a heartfelt tribute.

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Agriculture and economy

Tzotzil sheep husbandry is primarily a female-led activity, and the flocks are generally small and closely intertwined with agricultural activities. The production of wool for garment making and the acquisition of manure for fertilising agricultural plots are just some of the overarching purposes. In addition, families also engage in poultry and cattle farming.
 
In the Mexican countryside, particularly in Chiapas, a traditional and highly prevalent agricultural and organisational model called 'milpa' is commonly used. This model varies across regions and diets, but typically involves the cultivation of corn, beans, pumpkins, tomatoes, peppers, wild greens, and other vegetables, all harmoniously growing together – permaculture at its finest.

Challenges in Chiapas

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Chiapas is the state in Mexico that has the highest poverty rate in the country, with 72.2% of its population living in poverty (28.3% in extreme poverty and 46.1% in moderate poverty).

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With approximately 13.6% of their population being illiterate, Chiapas holds the leading position in Mexico in terms of educational deprivation.

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Women face exclusion in land tenure, use, and utilisation, resulting in their segregation in decision-making.

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Due to the development of agribusiness activities such as livestock farming, monocultures of oil palm and banana the deforestation has increased in some areas in Chiapas.

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The deforestation has led to a loss of water infiltration capacity, provoking water supply problems in certain regions of Chiapas.

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Since 2012, coffee plantations at lower elevations have been particularly affected by the impact of rust disease, which is why producers are cultivating more resistant varieties.

Ensambles regenerating

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Families receive a higher income for their coffee. During the 2022-2023 harvest we paid our allied coffee producers up to 38% above local prices.

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As a result of the promotion of the specialty coffee production, we have connected producers to national and international markets, with full traceability.

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So that more producers can offer their coffee on the demanding specialty market, we provide producers with training all year long about farm management, nutrition, soil health, pest control, wet milling, and sensory analysis.

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By running regional laboratories for physical and sensory analysis in coffee producing communities, we seek to bridge the gap between producers and the world of specialty coffee.

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We are cultivating equality between people from all genders in democratic processes through assemblies. 

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We support the economical emancipation of the indigenous women in the communities in Chiapas.

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We start the transitioning process towards an organic certification of the producers’ group we work with.

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In order to contribute to the conservation of ecosystems, all of the coffee producers assisted by Ensambles cultivate their crops under traditional polyculture.

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In order to contribute to the conservation of ecosystems, all of the coffee producers assisted by Ensambles cultivate their crops under traditional polyculture.

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